2017-10-06

DPower remote cartridge stove

I've been watching the BikerBits YouTube channel, and found some great advice in his "Shit Easy Motorcycle Camp Cooking" videos, and decided that I needed to add a gas stove to my collection, but wanted to do it as inexpensively as possible. I did a bit of research on advrider.com specifically in the stove thread, reading every single post there, and at long length finally decided on the approach I was going to take with this.

BikerBit's Mark Victor uses a butane cylinder with an adaptor and a "China Stove" somewhat similar to an MSR Pocket Rocket to cook his meals, and his system works quite well from boiling water for a cuppa, right down to simmering for cooking scrambled eggs or pancakes. I was impressed, and decided I would base my new setup on his, but with some changes.

I ordered my stove off of eBay.ca, and purchased the "Dpower Ultralight Folding Backpacking Camping Stove Gas-powered Stove with Piezoelectric" for about $13.95 CDN

Will this replace my trusty SVEA?
Butane to Lindal Gas Adapter
I also added a "Gas Adapter for Connecting Long Butane Canister to Hiking/Camping Stove" to my shopping cart, and after a visit to the local Canadian Tire outlet in Charlottetown for a $9.99 CDN three pack of butane cylinders, I was armed with everything I needed to use this stove when I got it, which was this afternoon.
227g x 3 cans = 681 grams of gas for $9.99
Of course I had to take this out onto the porch and fire it up...


I'm impressed! For a about $23 dollars I'm just about set, all I would need to add to this is a windscreen which I have in my regular "kitchen" set that costs about $5 CDN on ebay.ca

I was a bit disappointed in that the thin metal bracket that holds the piezoelectric igniter in place was bent, but I was able to set that right quickly with a pair of pliers, and it was very easy to disassemble the burner into it's component parts to right the problem.

I found that running on the butane mix, it worked very well at full throttle, and I was also able to taper the fuel off for a lovely simmer that should be perfect for pancakes or scrambled eggs as opposed to full on for simply boiling water.

CAUTION when using Butane Cylinders!

When I wondered why my stove flared up once in a while during testing, I did a Google search for "100% butane stove flare" and found this article on the subject: Butane Adapter Warning!

These cylinders are meant to be used in only two orientations...
  • Straight up in the vertical plane with the can set on a level surface
  • laying in a horizontal plane with the "Notch" of the can kept in the vertical. 
So I modified my setup by adding two pipe clamps joined together to create legs that would keep the cylinder oriented with the cylinder "notch" kept to the vertical as described in the blog.

I also made a wee 50 second video showing what happens when liquid butane enters the stove by improper position of the butane cylinder.  

Please note that there are other gas adapters which include some form of feet or stabilization for the cylinder. 




Update 2017-10-09:

I used the stove and adapter for the first time this past thanksgiving weekend at my campsite in Ship Harbour Nova Scotia, and found that the initial pressure of the butane cylinder had gone from a roar down to an easily controlled burn that made it a simple matter to set up and boil water for tea. I didn't time it, but it is easily as good as the SVEA at boiling up about 800ml of water, but a decent wraparound windscreen is a must to get good burn times in moderately windy conditions.

Note the notch is vertical, and the can is slanted slightly uphill.
Once again, cylinder position is important, and on the sloping ground I was careful to orient the cylinder top uphill and in the vertical.

The next morning at a temperature of about 16 degrees Celsius, the butane again performed well and I simply boiled up water for tea and oatmeal, then again some for washup. The ease of use alone with the piezoelectric igniter and a simple turn of the valve makes this setup extremely useful, although I miss my old SVEA, and I would prefer some wider bottomed pots where the small burner size of the SVEA leant it to smaller pot sizes.

If anything, setting up the windscreen took the longest time, and looking for the black stuff sack for the stove, the and black bag for the windscreen, all stuffed into the black kitchen bag took the longest time for the teardown. lol.

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